Video 2013
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  • 2/18/2013 Techniques and Technologies that address skin hyper pigmentation - Robert Falcone Ph.D  Peter Thomas Roth Labs

     Abstract: As the population in developed countries continues to age along with the growth of populations with colored skin, hyper-pigmentation becomes a more relevant aesthetic and health issue thus providing a new market opportunity for cosmetic and pharmaceutical formulators and marketing to explore the development of products. The talk will review the skin hyper pigmentation mechanisms and literature survey on all known / potential techniques and methodologies known to date.
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  • 3/11/2013 Lipid Based Nanosystems Of The Natural Flavnoid Quercetin For Topical Delivery - Sonali Bose Ph.D Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corporation

     Abstract: Quercetin is a naturally occurring flavonoid that holds tremendous potential as a topical anti-oxidant in mitigating or negating some of the harmful effects of oxidative stress leading to skin damage. This talk will focus on the development and characterization of lipid based nanosystems of quercetin and evaluate the efficacy of the developed systems for topical delivery
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  • 3/18/2013 Phytochemicals For Human Health and Beauty - Ilya Raskin Ph.D Rutgers University

    Bio: Dr. Raskin has over 20 years of experience in academic research in plant biology and pharmacology and 5 years of experience in industrial research in plant biotechnology. Dr. Raskin received a Ph.D. from Michigan State University in 1984 and joined the faculty of Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, in 1989 where he currently works as Professor II and President of the Global Institute for Bio-Exploration (GIBEX). He is also a Founder and Partner in Nutrasorb LLC and Food4Good Inc. These successful companies specialize in plant-derived functional foods, supplements and pharmaceuticals. Dr. Raskin is also a member of the NIH Center for Botanicals and Metabolic Syndrome.
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  • 4/1/2013 Formulation Effects on Activity of Iminosulfurane and Laurocapram based Penetration - Diksha Kaushik Ph.D Forest Laboratories

     Abstract: The delivery of the actives through the outermost layer of the skin, the stratum corneum, has posed a challenge for scientists for a very long time. There are compound called “enhancers” that have been developed to enhance drug delivery across skin and at the same time there are compounds referred to as “retardants” that prevent or retard the delivery of actives across the skin. Since both enhancers and retardants are believed to act by modifying the properties of the SC barrier, they are collectively referred to as “penetration modifiers”. This seminar addresses the formulation effects on the activity of minosulfurane and laurocapram based penetration modifiers through tools such as in vitro permeation studies, thermal, spectral and microscopic analyses, cytotoxicity studies and computer modeling experiments. 
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  • 4/8/2013 Glutamatergic  Signaling in Human Cancer - Suzie Chen Ph.d , Ernest Mario School of Pharmacy, Rutgers University

     Abstract: Skin cancer is the most common type of cancer in the United States. While melanoma accounts for only 4% of all types of the skin cancer, it has the highest death rate. Surgery is the main treatment showing great success for early melanoma and it also may be used as part of the management for late stage melanomas. Recent advances in treatment have improved outcomes for melanoma but the responses are not durable and relapse of this deadly disease is a near-certainty. Therefore, it remains critical to explore additional molecules and pathways that may contribute to melanoma pathogenesis. Our group demonstrated the etiological role of an aberrant expression of a murine neuronal receptor, metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 (GRM1) in mouse melanocytes in genetically modified transgenic mouse models. Ectopic expression of the human form of GRM1 was also observed in 60% of human melanoma cell lines and biopsy samples but not normal human melanocytes, suggesting its involvement in melanomagenesis. Metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 is a member of the G-protein-coupled receptor superfamily, and predominantly associated with excitatory synaptic neurotransmission in the mammalian central nervous system. The signaling cascades activated by the ligand, glutamate, are believed to be important in regulating the growth and differentiation of a wide variety of both neuronal and non-neuronal cells. We demonstrated that GRM1 is functional in melanoma cells and responsive to glutamate or GRM1-agonists by activating two of the signaling pathways that are known to be important in melanomagenesis, the MAPK and PI3K/AKT pathways. We identified AKT2 being the predominant isoform contributing to the activation of AKT. We theorize that one of the consequences of deregulated GRM1 expression in melanocytes is stimulation of pathways leading to an increase in cell growth and/or a decrease in apoptotic cell death resulting in cell transformation and subsequent tumor formation.
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  • 7/22/2013 Transdermal Drug Delivery Patches-Design Screening Methodology - Robert Falcone Ph.d  Peter Thomas Roth Labs

     Abstract: Transdermal Drug Delivery Patches are presently designed using  trial and error techniques. Recent research will show that a new screening  methodology based on theoretical calculations can help expedite the design and implementation of transdermal patches
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  • 8/26/2013 PharmaDur® “Virtual Patch” Technology for Dermal & Transdermal Products - Kishore Shah Ph.d  Polytherapeutics

     Abstract:  The PharmaDur® technology is based on a novel graft co-polymer having a combination of both hydrophilic and hydrophobic characteristics.  When a dermatological vehicle, e.g. cream, lotion, or a gel, formulated with PharmaDur® polymer is applied to skin, it forms an imperceptible and invisible hydrogel film ("A Virtual Patch").  PharmaDur® Virtual Patch is retained on the skin for 24 + hours and serves as a skin delivery system for actives.    Pharmaceutical and cosmetic products formulated with PharmaDur® exhibit long lasting effectiveness while minimizing skin irritation potential of actives.  Other beneficial attributes of the PharmaDur® delivery system include enhancement of drug bioavailability and non-transfer to other contacted surfaces (e.g. clothing).   
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  • 9/5/2013 Novel Non Steroidal Lipid Therapeutics for Chronic Skin Conditions - Jeffrey Stock Ph.d Princeton University 

     Abstract:  Inflammation and oxidative stress cause skin aging as well as a wide range of chronic skin diseases such as rosacea, atopic dermatitis, acne and psoriasis.  These conditions are associated with systemic imbalances in signal transduction pathways that normally function as homeostatic modulators to maintain skin health.  Oxidative stress results from the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) from environment factors such as UV, ozone and cigarette smoke.  Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) plays a central role in mediating intracellular responses to oxidative stress. Evidence will be presented showing that lipids such as Vitamin E and ceramide provide intracellular protection against oxidative stress through their ability to protect PP2A.   We are developing another class of lipid mediators, isoprenylcysteine (IPC) analogs, to block the activation of pro-inflammatory signaling pathways that are mediated by G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs).  IPCs provide a novel class of non-steroidal anti-inflammatories for topical use.   AFC (trademark name Arazine™) is our lead IPC ingredient for cosmetic use.  A more potent, closely related IPC analog, SIG990, is currently in development as an Rx candidate for rosacea.    
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  • 9/9/2013 The Delivery of Drugs, Skin Sensory Benefits and Increased Mildness through Topical Pharmaceutical Excipient Selection  -  Romanski Ph.d and Richardson MS

     Abstract: The formulation of topical pharmaceutical products for dermatology is an inherently complex process where in many cases the excipient selection can be as important as the active drug in order to reach the desired drug delivery profile, formulation mildness, and even the sensory perception of the end product. BASF, a company with a strong global pharmaceutical presence, has recently built an extensive topical pharmaceutical excipients portfolio offering a wide variety of compendial-grade emollients, emulsifiers, and consistency factors to find solutions to ubiquitous pharmaceutical industry problems. In this presentation, highlights from a series of ongoing laboratory activities at our Global Dermatology Laboratory in Tarrytown, NY will be presented, showcasing the depth and importance of excipients in the formulation design of topical pharmaceutical products. Specifically, a battery of membrane penetration studies used to determine the effect of emollients and emulsifiers on drug diffusion through the stratum corneum, as well as surface wetting and lateral drug transport will be presented.  These results will be further corroborated by the use of commercially available software for the temporal modeling of drug penetration in multi-phase formulations. Furthermore, the irritation potential of several excipients will be discussed utilizing a series of trans-epithelial cell permeability assays, where epithelial cell monolayers are cultured onto a semi-permeable membrane to form tight cell-cell junctions and used to study the penetration rate of Na-fluorescein after cell monolayers are exposed to excipients in our portfolio and a known irritant (Sodium Lauryl Sulfate). Finally, a series of sensory perception studies are quantified using a collection of trained and untrained panel members for the evaluation of important sensory parameters such as greasiness, cushion, and overall skin comfort; each with a unique impact on patient compliance 
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  • 9/24/2013 Confocal Microscopy of Skin Cancers: Current Topics In Technology and Translational Research  -  Milind Rajadhyaksha Ph.d Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center 

     Abstract: Confocal microscopy of skin in vivo has enabled noninvasive diagnosis of melanoma and basalcell carcinoma (BCC) with high sensitivity and specificity, and pre-operative and intra-operative mapping of cancer margins to guide surgery. Current research is focused on (1) development of machine learning-based classification algorithms toward computer-aided tools for reading and analysis of images, (2) mosaicing approaches to detect BCC margins in freshly excised tissue ex vivo toward enabling rapid pathology at-the-bedside to guide Mohs surgery, (3) imaging-guided laser ablation of BCCs toward less invasive and more efficient treatment with reduced need for conventional excision-and-pathology, and (4) developing line-scanning approaches toward low-cost devices for wider dissemination. 
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