Videos 2014

 

  • 2/10/2014 Skin Microdialysis: Insights and Applications to Topical and Transdermal Delivery - Grazia Stagni Ph.D,MS,  Arnold & Marie Schwartz College of Pharmacy, Long Island University

     Abstract: Skin microdialysis (MD) is a semi-invasive technique that allows the measurement of unbound molecules in the interstitial fluids of dermis or subcutaneous tissues.  The main research applications of MD in the pharmaceutical area are (i) to study percutaneous absorption from topically applied drug delivery systems, (ii) to understand better the pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic of drug acting in the skin, and (iii) a combination of the two.  This presentation will review the technical aspects related to the use of microdialysis in the skin and will summarize some examples of relevant research applications such as the assessment of bioavailability and bioequivalence of dermatological topical products and the selection of best topical formulation.
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  • 5/7/2014 Pathways to Develop and Grow a Line of Skincare Products - Ni'Kita Wilson CEO & Director of Innovation at Catalyst Cosmetic Development LLC

     Abstract: A surprising number of international skin care companies were once the dreams of individuals.Opportunities to create jobs through innovation and entrepreneurship in the area of skincare products are of great interest to many people. Interest is high, in part, because it looks easy to create something like a skin cleansing product by just mixing ingredients. Others have been discouraged because they believe the process is overly complex. This expert, introductory discussion provides an opportunity to gain insights and learn what is possible. The overall goal of this session is to create awareness of the process and resources available which make it possible to develop and grow a skincare product line.Anyone and others with interest in the area of skincare products from entrepreneurs to faculty, students, researchers, people in economic development and new ventures may benefit from this discussion.
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  • 5/19/2014 Performance and Patient Compliance - A Perspective Viewing Topical Product Design in a New Light - Mark Chandler President, ACT Solutions Corp

     Abstract: Topical drug development is an arduous task.  Treatment cosmetic product design is a difficult assignment.  Drug and cosmetic actives need to be selected and vetted.  Compatibility of these with formulation vehicles need to be explored.  Clinical trials need to be performed.  Product and package stability has to be achieved.  Safety and Regulatory hurdles need to be jumped.  And on it goes.  Aesthetic and efficacy elements, as they relate to the formulation vehicle of a topical product, are generally ignored, given the gravity of the other tasks necessary for a successful drug application or treatment cosmetic launch.  This does not need to be the case.  In fact, ignoring aesthetic and efficacy elements in the formulation design process can lead to failure at many stages of a topical product life cycle.  Conversely, paying attention to these elements can lead to success.
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  • 9/29/2014 Mechanisms of Photodamage and Protection with Sunscreens - Linda Rhein Ph.D,MS - Bayer Health Care Pharmaceuticals

     Abstract: Photodamage leads to mutations in the DNA and to destruction of skin matrix. Persistent UV exposure can result in rhytides, lentigines and in some instances skin cancers. UV exposure leads to dimerization of pyrimidine bases, cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers and, to a lesser extent, the pyrimidine (6– 4) pyrimidone photoproduct and their Dewar isomers and to mechanisms involving oxidized DNA bases. Replication of damaged DNA leads to an error-prone incorporation of nucleotides at the site of a photolesion, giving rise to mutations.
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  • 8/4/2014 Skin Delivery Platform - Romanski Ph.d - BASF

     Abstract: The formulation of topical and transdermal products for the delivery of Rx and OTC pharmaceuticals through the skin is an inherently complex process where in many cases the excipient selection can be as important as the active drug. When selecting excipients, numerous criteria should be utilized in order to reach the desired drug delivery profile, formulation mildness, and the sensory perception of the final product. BASF Pharma Ingredients and Services focuses on the global needs of the dermatology industry by providing compendial materials for the development of topical and transdermal products. In this work, highlights from the current research activities at our Global Skin Delivery Laboratory in Tarrytown, NY will be presented. Specifically, data highlighting the use of solvents, emollients and surfactants to promote skin penetration and effective drug delivery will be shown by manipulating the fundamental science of mass transfer through the skin. These results will be further corroborated by the use of various theoretical tools for the temporal modeling of drug penetration in multi-phase formulations. The ability to mitigate irritation and promote mildness using excipients will be discussed utilizing both in vitro and in vivo studies. Next, a series of sensory perception studies will be discussed utilizing a collection of trained and untrained panel members for the evaluation of important sensory parameters such as greasiness, cushion, and overall skin comfort; each with a unique impact on patient compliance. Finally, innovative ways to utilize both widely used, as well as novel excipients for enhancing skin delivery will be presented.The formulation of topical and transdermal products for the delivery of Rx and OTC pharmaceuticals through the skin is an inherently complex process where in many cases the excipient selection can be as important as the active drug. When selecting excipients, numerous criteria should be utilized in order to reach the desired drug delivery profile, formulation mildness, and the sensory perception of the final product. BASF Pharma Ingredients and Services focuses on the global needs of the dermatology industry by providing compendial materials for the development of topical and transdermal products. In this work, highlights from the current research activities at our Global Skin Delivery Laboratory in Tarrytown, NY will be presented. Specifically, data highlighting the use of solvents, emollients and surfactants to promote skin penetration and effective drug delivery will be shown by manipulating the fundamental science of mass transfer through the skin. These results will be further corroborated by the use of various theoretical tools for the temporal modeling of drug penetration in multi-phase formulations. The ability to mitigate irritation and promote mildness using excipients will be discussed utilizing both in vitro and in vivo studies. Next, a series of sensory perception studies will be discussed utilizing a collection of trained and untrained panel members for the evaluation of important sensory parameters such as greasiness, cushion, and overall skin comfort; each with a unique impact on patient compliance. Finally, innovative ways to utilize both widely used, as well as novel excipients for enhancing skin delivery will be presented. 
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  • 12/08/2014 The Role of Provisional Matrix in Corneal Epithelial Wound Healing - Marion K. Gordon Ph.D,  Rutgers University

     Abstract: Vesicants such as sulfur mustard (SM) and nitrogen mustard (NM) cause blistering of skin, and microblistering of the cornea. These blisters are highly similar to those caused by ultraviolet (UVB) exposure, showing epithelial separation at the same blister plane as that from UVB, ie., at the basal surface of the basal epithelial cells, where they sit on their basement membrane. Physicians have noted for almost 100 years that mustard injuries take longer to heal than blisters incurred by other injuries. To examine this delay in healing after mustard injury, we have followed wound closure over the course of 7 days in corneal organ cultures exposed to doses of NM and UVB that induce equivalent epithelial- stromal separation. Our data show that matrix deposited in the wound bed (the provisional matrix) is an important player in the delay. The anti-adhesive provisional matrix components deposited in the wound bed are removed at least a day later in the healing mustard wound than in the UVB-induced wound. In addition, fibronectin, a pro-migratory provisional matrix component, was found to be delayed in its deposition into the wound bed of a mustard injury as compared to an equivalent UVB injury. The demonstration of delayed healing after mustard injury highlights the importance of considering the provisional matrix when developing potential therapies for mustard injury. 
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